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The Daily: Semester Abroad in Tehran?

The Daily: Semester Abroad in Tehran?

March 21, 2014 11:30 am by: Julia Watson Category: The Daily Leave a comment A+ / A-

Our round-up of news, notes, tips, and tweets exhibiting how public diplomacy affects the world each and every day.

The U.S. Treasury has opened the door for academic exchanges between U.S. students and Iran. But how likely are they to actually happen, with all the red tape of sanctions?

While this all seems great on paper, sanctions critics will likely point to the fact that the majority of these services and/or exchanges will be accompanied by necessary financial transactions that other US sanctions on Iran currently impede. For example, how will an Iranian pay to participate in an online course? How will tuition payments be made? How does a US citizen relocating to Iran to participate in a course of study at an Iranian university transfer their money there? And where will they keep their funds since sanctions prohibit US persons from having a bank account at an Iranian bank? [LobeLog]

 

  

This paper gives an interesting glimpse into first-hand accounts of Qatar’s “attractiveness” and how they impact its soft power as a nation.

Qatar’s ability to maintain its indigenous culture adds to its soft power by providing visitors with a taste of the State’s rich and prestigious past, providing travellers alike with the kind of cultural experience found in few other locales; the State’s ability to incorporate forms of modernity into this historical significance both adds to Qatar’s attractiveness by providing tourists with pleasurable and familiar tastes, yet also severely diminishes the authenticity and consequently, charm of the complex. [E-International Relations]

 

 

Sadık Ünay’s piece on the potential for economic diplomacy in Turkey makes a case for approaching soft power from an economic perspective.

The flexible and evolving priorities of economic diplomacy include “project advocacy” in the case of major international contracts and facilitate new export market openings through preferential trading areas and customs unions. They also facilitate corporate alliances for research and development as well as technology transfers, contributing to the inflows of foreign direct investment and taking an active role in global governance platforms.

He pushes for Turkey to adopt this approach to stay competitive globally.

Looking to the future, it does not require tremendous expertise to predict that Turkey’s economic diplomacy will increasingly focus on issues of effectiveness in global governance platforms. A new generation of economic diplomats will be needed who can articulate the interests of Turkey and similar developing countries on international platforms in view of socio-political realities and business interests. [SETA]

 

 

 

Hisham Aidi offers a fascinating and thorough analysis of the U.S.’s counter-jihadi hip hop efforts, and questions whether we are looking at the modern version of jazz diplomacy.

Those who argue that hip-hop diplomacy can be as effective as its jazzy counterpart in the 1950s also overlook Washington’s alliances with autocrats in North Africa and the Middle East. The U.S. used jazz to “sell” America behind the Iron Curtain and stoke dissent in Soviet-backed regimes. But can American “soft power” liberate people in U.S.-backed tyrannies? The government’s hip-hop initiatives may generate goodwill in Europe, where Muslims are marginalized but have political rights, or in non-allied dictatorships like Burma, where rap artists are heavily censored, than in authoritarian regimes backed by U.S. hard power. [The Atlantic]

 

 

photo credit: Mohamed Somji

The Daily: Semester Abroad in Tehran? Reviewed by Julia Watson on . Our round-up of news, notes, tips, and tweets exhibiting how public diplomacy affects the world each and every day. [divide] The U.S. Treasury has opened the do Our round-up of news, notes, tips, and tweets exhibiting how public diplomacy affects the world each and every day. [divide] The U.S. Treasury has opened the do Rating: 0

About Julia Watson

Julia Watson is a current public diplomacy graduate student at Syracuse University's S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Her interests include cultural diplomacy, international communication and Middle Eastern affairs, and in her free time she enjoys learning obscure languages and experimenting with new recipes.
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